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joyssssse  

Sexty years odd, with a besotted fondness for literalture, aritfice and joycean puns all of which runs rampant through my life and by extention this blog alzo. i live by a creek in the hills of northern california with the love of my life. i spend most of my time taking care of my land, growing stuff and creating stuff. it's a good life.

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Mohammad Reza Domiri Ganji Photography

1.Dolat Abad , Yazd — in Yazd, Iran.

2.Jameh Mosque of Yazd — in Yazd, Iran.

3.Aliqoli agha Bath , Isfahan — in Isfahan, Esfahan, Iran.

3 weeks ago
19 notes
spacehangout:

That Indescribable Feeling You get When You Gaze Back at Earth from Space

Seeing our home planet from space is one of those self-reflective experiences, like seeing yourself in a picture, or hearing your voice on tape. It tells you something about yourself from outside of yourself. It is an experience that changes your understanding of the world and your place in it. 

This phenomenon is best illustrated by the words of space travelers who, upon reaching orbit, have gazed back at Earth and felt the profound impact of viewing the planet in its entirety.

Neil Armstrong, the first person to step foot on the Moon, described the feeling of perspective he experienced when staring out at the Earth from the spacecraft window: “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

William Anders (Apollo 8 mission), had this to say: “We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.”

Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, said, “The view of the Earth from the Moon fascinated me — a small disk, 240,000 miles away… Raging nationalistic interests, famines, wars, pestilence don’t show from that distance.”

Alan Shepard, commander of the Apollo 14 mission, the eighth manned mission to the Moon, said of the experience of seeing the home planet in its entirety, “If somebody had said before the flight, ‘Are you going to get carried away looking at the Earth from the Moon?’ I would have said, ‘No, no way.’ But yet when I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried!”

Credit: NASA

spacehangout:

That Indescribable Feeling You get When You Gaze Back at Earth from Space

Seeing our home planet from space is one of those self-reflective experiences, like seeing yourself in a picture, or hearing your voice on tape. It tells you something about yourself from outside of yourself. It is an experience that changes your understanding of the world and your place in it.

This phenomenon is best illustrated by the words of space travelers who, upon reaching orbit, have gazed back at Earth and felt the profound impact of viewing the planet in its entirety.

Neil Armstrong, the first person to step foot on the Moon, described the feeling of perspective he experienced when staring out at the Earth from the spacecraft window: “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

William Anders (Apollo 8 mission), had this to say: “We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.”

Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, said, “The view of the Earth from the Moon fascinated me — a small disk, 240,000 miles away… Raging nationalistic interests, famines, wars, pestilence don’t show from that distance.”

Alan Shepard, commander of the Apollo 14 mission, the eighth manned mission to the Moon, said of the experience of seeing the home planet in its entirety, “If somebody had said before the flight, ‘Are you going to get carried away looking at the Earth from the Moon?’ I would have said, ‘No, no way.’ But yet when I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried!”

Credit: NASA

(Source: facebook.com, via im-a-fucking-alien)

1 month ago
247 notes
japaneseaesthetics:

"Grapes" by TACHIHARA Kyosho (1786-1840), Japan : Important Cultural Property 立原杏所

japaneseaesthetics:

"Grapes" by TACHIHARA Kyosho (1786-1840), Japan : Important Cultural Property 立原杏所

1 month ago
292 notes

summermercer:

Now I’m sewing, sewing, sewing medicine bundles
With grass threads and porcupine quills
And I’m filling them up with galaxy beams
And with all the stars you’ve snuffed
And all the ghosts you’ve been
And with every shape you’ve morphed
And all the trees you’ve stumped
And I’m filling them up with all the blood
Your heart has pumped and pumped
And with all of the love that your mouth has rushed
With all of the voices that your ears have rung
And with all of the life that your dirt has sprung
And with all of the magic that your gardens have grown
I’m filling up these bundles with all the seeds
You’ve sewn, and sewn, and sewn
And all the roots you’ve webbed and all the wind
You’ve blown, and blown, and blown

2 months ago
1 note
The Other

superpillowcastle:

Allen here, about to drop some knowledge about a major influence to our game, Jorge Luis Borges, and his short story “The Other.”

MUSE is a game about unreality. Surrealism. The Bizarre. The Weird. The Unknown Known that leaks through the cracks of our existence and leads us to question that…

(via weaponartist)

1 month ago
3 notes
Ways to Be Better You

r20s:

Chances are, you are already a pretty great person, but this could be your time to be even better and realize your full potential. There are some simple, free, and painless things that you can start to do right now to become an even better version of yourself. Here are 10 ways to be a…

1 month ago
3,480 notes




Black hole consumes a star

Black hole consumes a star

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via im-a-fucking-alien)

1 month ago
314,387 notes
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Reader unquietcode asks:

I saw this post recently and it made me wonder what’s going on. If you look in the upper right of the frame as the camera submerges, you can see a little vortex of water whirring about. Even with the awesome power of the wave rolling forward a little tornado of water seems able to stably form. Any idea what causes this phenomenon?

This awesome clip was taken from John John Florence’s "& Again" surf video. What you’re seeing is the vortex motion of a plunging breaking wave. As ocean waves approach the shore, the water depth decreases, which amplifies the wave’s height. When the wave reaches a critical height, it breaks and begins to lose its energy to turbulence. There are multiple kinds of breaking waves, but plungers are the classic surfer’s wave. These waves become steep enough that the top of the wave  overturns and plunges into the water ahead of the wave. This generates the vortex-like tube you see in the animation. Such waves can produce complicated three-dimensional vortex structures like those seen in this video by Clark Little. Any initial variation in the main vortex gets stretched as the wave rolls on, and this spins up and strengthens the rib vortices seen wrapped around the primary vortex. (Source video: B. Kueny and J. Florence)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Reader unquietcode asks:

I saw this post recently and it made me wonder what’s going on. If you look in the upper right of the frame as the camera submerges, you can see a little vortex of water whirring about. Even with the awesome power of the wave rolling forward a little tornado of water seems able to stably form. Any idea what causes this phenomenon?

This awesome clip was taken from John John Florence’s "& Again" surf video. What you’re seeing is the vortex motion of a plunging breaking wave. As ocean waves approach the shore, the water depth decreases, which amplifies the wave’s height. When the wave reaches a critical height, it breaks and begins to lose its energy to turbulence. There are multiple kinds of breaking waves, but plungers are the classic surfer’s wave. These waves become steep enough that the top of the wave  overturns and plunges into the water ahead of the wave. This generates the vortex-like tube you see in the animation. Such waves can produce complicated three-dimensional vortex structures like those seen in this video by Clark Little. Any initial variation in the main vortex gets stretched as the wave rolls on, and this spins up and strengthens the rib vortices seen wrapped around the primary vortex. (Source video: B. Kueny and J. Florence)

2 months ago
2,235 notes